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Bread Formulation Software

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Bread Formulation Software

How to BreadStorm — A Tutorial

This tutorial goes through three examples of entering bread formulas into BreadStorm: a straight dough, a formula with a pre-ferment, and a formula with 2 pre-ferments and a soaker.

Click the .bun file to download these 3 bread formulas.

3 Bread Formulas developed by MC.bun

Import the .bun file into BreadStorm, then scale the formulas for your own baking. If you haven't done so already, be sure to download the free version of BreadStorm for Mac, or install the free BreadStorm Reader onto your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch.

We created this tutorial in collaboration with MC, our friend, fellow bread baker, and BreadStorm user.

Each example uses a bread formula developed by MC and originally posted on her blog, Farine.

Example 1: A Straight Dough

Our first example shows how to put MC's Learning Loaf into BreadStorm.

MC's Learning Loaf from her blog, Farine:


Old dough

  • 210 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 137 g water
  • 4 g salt
  • A scant pinch of instant yeast

OR:

  • A 350 g piece of dough saved from a previous mix

Final dough

  • 631 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 70 g wholegrain rye flour (also called dark rye flour)
  • 484 g water
  • 14 g salt
  • A pinch of instant yeast
  • All of the old dough (about 350 g)

For the method and the story behind this bread, please visit MC's original blog post

Step 1:

We begin by clicking the "New" button on the toolbar, to create a new bread formula. Then we enter the ingredient names into BreadStorm. This formula calls for old dough, and we happen to have some handy, left over from baking with the Chicago Amateur Bread Bakers. But we're not sure of the exact composition of the old dough, so we'll enter it just as we would any other ingredient.

Entering ingredient names into BreadStorm™

Step 2:

Looking at how MC has described the recipe for her Learning Loaf, we see that she has given ingredients in weights.

So we'll click the weight button and then enter the weights into BreadStorm.

Entering weights into BreadStorm™

Step 3:

Next, we tell BreadStorm which ingredients are our flour ingredients by clicking on the little flour icons. In response, BreadStorm automatically calculates the baker's percentages for us.

Marking flour ingredients in BreadStorm™

Step 4:

We're done. We can save the formula, and scale it as we like.

To scale, first we click the % button, . . .

Scaling a formula in BreadStorm

Scaling a formula in BreadStorm

. . . and then we select the ingredient we'd like to scale by (in this case, old dough). And then we type in the weight of this ingredient.

In our case, we have only 200 grams of old dough handy, so we're going to scale by this amount, and let BreadStorm tell us how much bread we can make.

We created this tutorial in collaboration with MC, our friend, fellow bread baker, and BreadStorm user.

Each example uses a bread formula developed by MC and originally posted on her blog, Farine.

MC's Learning Loaf from her blog, Farine:


Old dough

  • 210 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 137 g water
  • 4 g salt
  • A scant pinch of instant yeast

OR:

  • A 350 g piece of dough saved from a previous mix

Final dough

  • 631 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 70 g wholegrain rye flour (also called dark rye flour)
  • 484 g water
  • 14 g salt
  • A pinch of instant yeast
  • All of the old dough (about 350 g)

For the method and the story behind this bread, please visit MC's original blog post

Comments:

Now that MC's Learning Loaf is in BreadStorm, we can observe the nature of this bread by looking at its baker's percentages.

Exploring the nature of a bread in BreadStorm™

For example, we see that 90% of the flour is all-purpose wheat flour, and 10% is whole-rye. From experience we know to expect that the crumb will have a grayish tinge from this small amount of rye flour. While 10% rye looks modest, it, in fact, is enough to give a stunning flavor boost to the bread. (By the way, in a bread formula, all flour ingredients always add up to 100%.)

The dough's water (or "hydration" as bakers like to say) is 69%. This tells us that the dough is going to be somewhat soft, but still quite easy to handle and shape. The immeasurably small amount of instant yeast is a testament to long and slow fermentation, so critical to good bread. Salt at 2% tells us that this has a typical level of salt, good for sandwiches, for example. The inclusion of old dough will make the flavor more complex; it will also give the loaf a longer shelf life.

MC's Learning Loaf.bun

Download this formula and import it into BreadStorm. Then you can read and scale the formula for your own baking.

If you don't yet have BreadStorm, download the free version of BreadStorm for Mac, or install the free BreadStorm Reader onto your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch.

MC's Learning Loaf.bun


Example 2: Using a Pre-ferment

If we don't happen to have any old dough on hand, we'll do as MC describes in her Learning Loaf post and create some "old dough" for this bread.

Again, for your reference, here is MC's Learning Loaf as posted on her blog, Farine:


Old dough

  • 210 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 137 g water
  • 4 g salt
  • A scant pinch of instant yeast

OR:

  • A 350 g piece of dough saved from a previous mix

Final dough

  • 631 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 70 g wholegrain rye flour (also called dark rye flour)
  • 484 g water
  • 14 g salt
  • A pinch of instant yeast
  • All of the old dough (about 350 g)

For the method and the story behind this bread, please visit MC's original blog post

Step 1:

Just as in Example 1, we begin by entering the ingredients for the Learning Loaf. But this time, we don't enter "Old Dough" on its own line:

Entering weights into BreadStorm

Step 2:

We'll set up the old dough as a pre-ferment in BreadStorm. We call it a "pre-ferment" because some of the flour that goes into the overall bread formula is fermented in advance of the Final Mix.

To add a preferment, we click on the little plus sign (+) next to the "Pre-ferments/Soakers" label and click "Pate Fermentée," the French name for Old Dough:

Adding a pre-ferment in BreadStorm

Step 3:

Since MC listed her bread's ingredients in weights, in BreadStorm we switch to weight mode, then enter these weights.

We put the weights for the old dough ingredients in the Pate Fermentée column, and the weights MC gave for Final Dough go in the Final Mix column:

Entering weights in BreadStorm

Step 4:

Lastly, we tell BreadStorm which ingredients are our flour ingredients.

To do this, we click the little flour icons. In response, BreadStorm will automatically calculate the baker's percentages for us.

Save the formula, and we're done.

Marking flour ingredients in BreadStorm

Again, for your reference, here is MC's Learning Loaf as posted on her blog, Farine:


Old dough

  • 210 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 137 g water
  • 4 g salt
  • A scant pinch of instant yeast

OR:

  • A 350 g piece of dough saved from a previous mix

Final dough

  • 631 g all-purpose flour, unbleached
  • 70 g wholegrain rye flour (also called dark rye flour)
  • 484 g water
  • 14 g salt
  • A pinch of instant yeast
  • All of the old dough (about 350 g)

For the method and the story behind this bread, please visit MC's original blog post

Comments:

This bread has identical nature to the formula in Example 1. It differs only in that its pre-ferment is broken out in its own column.

Formula from Example 1:

Exploring the nature of a bread formula in BreadStorm

Formula from Example 2 (this example):

Exploring the nature of a bread formula in BreadStorm

Example 2 breaks out the pre-ferment in a separate column. This allows BreadStorm to account for the flour in the pre-ferment (Pate Fermentée or "Old Dough"). The result is that the Total Formula column (leftmost column) more accurately reflects the nature of MC's bread.

MC's Learning Loaf with Old Dough.bun

Download this formula and import it into BreadStorm. Then you can read and scale the formula for your own baking.

If you don't yet have BreadStorm, download the free version of BreadStorm for Mac, or install the free BreadStorm Reader onto your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch.

MC's Learning Loaf with Old Dough.bun


Example 3: Two Pre-Ferments + a Soaker

This example uses MC's One-handed Ciabatta, a much more complex formula than our previous examples. The formula uses a wild yeast levain, two pre-ferments, and a soaker, which lend the baked loaf complex flavor and rich texture.

MC has provided this formula to her readers in weights, so we'll enter this formula into BreadStorm using weights.

For reference, MC's One-handed Ciabatta as posted on her blog, Farine:


Ingredients (for 3 ciabattas)

  • 450 g unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 150 g whole-wheat flour
  • 150 g teff mash (75g teff flour + 75g water)
  • Water 1: 350 g
  • Water 2: 100 g
  • 80 g sunflower seeds, toasted and briefly soaked
  • 150 g ripe liquid levain (100% hydration)
  • 150 g ripe poolish (75 g flour + 75 g water + a pinch of instant yeast)
  • 18 g fine sea salt

For the method and the story behind this bread, please visit MC's original blog post

Step 1:

First, let's begin by entering the ingredients:

Entering ingredients into BreadStorm

Then we'll set up the overall structure of the formula. We add columns for the 2 pre-ferments: the poolish and the teff mash.

For the poolish, we click on the little plus sign (+) next to the "Pre-ferments/Soakers" label and click "Poolish"

Adding a poolish to a bread formula in BreadStorm

To add the teff mash, we'll use an advanced feature of BreadStorm, a "Custom Pre-ferment."

We click on the little plus sign (+) next to "Pre-ferments/Soakers," then click "More," then "Custom Pre-ferment..." A window pops up and lets us type in the name "Teff Mash:"

Naming a custom pre-ferment in BreadStorm

Next we add a column for the soaker, in the same manner as we added the pre-ferments. The formula's structure is now in place:

For reference, MC's One-handed Ciabatta as posted on her blog, Farine:


Ingredients (for 3 ciabattas)

  • 450 g unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 150 g whole-wheat flour
  • 150 g teff mash (75g teff flour + 75g water)
  • Water 1: 350 g
  • Water 2: 100 g
  • 80 g sunflower seeds, toasted and briefly soaked
  • 150 g ripe liquid levain (100% hydration)
  • 150 g ripe poolish (75 g flour + 75 g water + a pinch of instant yeast)
  • 18 g fine sea salt

For the method and the story behind this bread, please visit MC's original blog post

Comments:

When constructing this formula, we entered weights for the Poolish, Teff Mash, Soaker, and Final Mix, each column in turn. The Total Formula column (leftmost column of numbers in the formula, shown below), BreadStorm calculated automatically for us. Looking at the Total Formula percentages, we can observe the nature of this bread:

Exploring a bread formula in BreadStorm

The most striking characteristic of this formula is its 80% water. This hydration is on the high end, as we would expect in a ciabatta. In a high-hydration loaf, we know to expect an open crumb with holes varying in size.

The sunflower seeds will add both a nutty flavor and interesting texture to the bread's crust and crumb. Soaking the seeds softens them, and will result in a loaf that has texture and flavor imparted by the seeds but also a light and airy quality.

MC's One-handed Ciabatta.bun

Download this formula and import it into BreadStorm. Then you can read and scale the formula for your own baking.

If you don't yet have BreadStorm, download the free version of BreadStorm for Mac, or install the free BreadStorm Reader onto your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch.

Adding a soaker to a bread formula in BreadStorm

Step 2:

Next we switch to weight mode and enter the weights for the pre-ferments, the soaker, and the Final Mix. Beginning with MC's poolish (75 g flour + 75 g water + a pinch of instant yeast):

Entering weights for a complex bread formula in BreadStorm

Then MC's teff mash (75g teff flour + 75g water):

Entering weights for a complex bread formula in BreadStorm

Then the soaker. In her ciabatta post, MC tells us to pour over the sunflower seeds just enough water to cover. That works out to about 30 grams of water:

Entering weights for a complex bread formula in BreadStorm

Lastly, the Final Mix weights. We've already used 30 grams of the water for the soaker. We'll put the rest of it into the Final Mix. We've decided to put all of the formula's water on a single line. This makes it easier to see the total hydration. Structuring the formula this way is a matter of preference:

Entering weights for a complex bread formula in BreadStorm

Step 3:

To complete the formula, we mark the flour ingredients and the soaked ingredients. As we do this, BreadStorm will immediately calculate the baker's percentages for us:

Marking flour and soaked ingredients in BreadStorm

Save, and the formula is complete.

As you look across this complex formula, notice that in each column total flour equals 100%. This is true of all bread formulas, by definition. Also notice that in the soaker column, the sunflower seeds being soaked, they also equal 100% by definition.

Tip: When developing a bread formula, always keep in mind that all flour in each column must add up to 100%; and in the case of a soaker column, all of the ingredients being soaked in liquid must add up to 100%. When you enter a formula in weights—as we've done in each of the formulas on this page—BreadStorm takes care of these calculations for you.

Comments:

When constructing this formula, we entered weights for the Poolish, Teff Mash, Soaker, and Final Mix, each column in turn. The Total Formula column (leftmost column of numbers in the formula, shown below), BreadStorm calculated automatically for us. Looking at the Total Formula percentages, we can observe the nature of this bread:

Exploring a bread formula in BreadStorm

The most striking characteristic of this formula is its 80% water. This hydration is on the high end, as we would expect in a ciabatta. In a high-hydration loaf, we know to expect an open crumb with holes varying in size.

The sunflower seeds will add both a nutty flavor and interesting texture to the bread's crust and crumb. Soaking the seeds softens them, and will result in a loaf that has texture and flavor imparted by the seeds but also a light and airy quality.

MC's One-handed Ciabatta.bun

Download this formula and import it into BreadStorm. Then you can read and scale the formula for your own baking.

If you don't yet have BreadStorm, download the free version of BreadStorm for Mac, or install the free BreadStorm Reader onto your iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch.

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